Monday, October 31, 2005

President Bush's Remarks at Alito Nomination


I’m pleased to announce my nomination of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. as associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

Judge Alito is one of the most accomplished and respected judges in America. And his long career in public service has given him an extraordinary breadth of experience.

As a Justice Department official, federal prosecutor and judge on the United States Court of Appeals, Sam Alito has shown a mastery of the law, a deep commitment of justice, and he is a man of enormous character.

He is scholarly, fair-minded and principled, and these qualities will serve our nation well on the highest court of the land.

Judge Alito showed great promise from the beginning in studies at Princeton and Yale Law School, as editor of the Yale Law Journal, as a clerk for a federal court of appeals judge.

He served in the Army Reserves and was honorably discharged as a captain.
Early in his career, Sam Alito worked as a federal prosecutor and handled criminal and civil matters for the United States. As assistant to the solicitor general, he argued 12 cases before the Supreme Court, and has argued dozens of others before the federal courts of appeals.

He served in the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel, providing constitutional advice for the president and the executive branch.

In 1987, President Ronald Reagan named him the United States attorney for the District of New Jersey, the top prosecutor in one of the nation’s largest federal districts. And he was confirmed by unanimous consent by the Senate.

He moved aggressively against white collar and environmental crimes, and drug trafficking and organized crime and violation of civil rights.

In his role, Sam Alito showed a passionate commitment to the rule of law, and he gained a reputation for being both tough and fair.

In 1990, President Bush nominated Sam Alito, at the age of 39, for the United States Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit.

He has a deep understanding of the proper role of judges in our society. He understands that judges are to interpret the laws, not to impose their preferences or priorities on the people.

In the performance of his duties, Judge Alito has gained the respect of his colleagues and attorneys for his brilliance and decency. He’s won admirers across the political spectrum.

I’m confident that the United States Senate will be impressed by Judge Alito’s distinguished record, his measured judicial temperament and his tremendous personal integrity. And I urge the Senate to act promptly on this important nomination so that an up-or-down vote is held before the end of this year.

Today, Judge Alito is joined by his wife, Martha, who was a law librarian when he first met her. Sam and I both know you can’t go wrong marrying a librarian.

Sam and Martha’s two children, Phil and Laura (ph), are also with us.

And I know how proud you are of your dad today.

I’m sure, as well, that Judge Alito is thinking of his mom, Rose, who will be 91 in December. And I know he’s thinking about his late father. Samuel Alito Sr. came to this country as a immigrant from Italy in 1914. And his fine family has realized the great promise of our country.

Judge, thanks for agreeing to serve. And congratulations on your nomination.

Monday, October 17, 2005

UN Chokes on Abstinence

Stephen Lewis, the United Nations' special envoy to Africa for HIV/AIDS, has little good to say about the Bush administration's efforts there.

That the United States is spending more money than any other nation on stopping the spread of AIDS in Africa counts for little. He is upset with the US emphasis on abstinence, which he accuses of causing a condom shortage in Uganda.

Now Uganda happens to be the only sub-Saharan African country that has achieved a large reduction in its HIV prevalence rate. The adult HIV infection rate has dropped from 18% to 5-7%. No other nation in the world has achieved such success. Most sub-Saharan African nations, following the pro-condoms model, continue to suffer from rising HIV infection rates.

But then, other African nations do not have leaders like Ugandan President Museveni and his wife. This dynamic duo has consistently promoted an abstinence-first model that has successfully changed Ugandan culture. Ugandan surveys show a reduction in premarital sexual activity among Ugandan youth and a reduction in extramarital activity among adults.

The result: less AIDS.

This is, in Lewis's worldview, all wrong. He complains that the Bush administration’s shift of funding from condoms to abstinence promotion under its PEPFAR program has led to a shortage of the prophylactics in Uganda. “There is no doubt in my mind that the condom crisis in Uganda is being driven by PEPFAR,” said Lewis. “To impose a dogma-driven policy that is fundamentally flawed is doing damage to Africa."

This is a bizarre inversion of the truth, and threatens to do grievous harm to the one HIV/AIDS prevention approach that has actually worked.


Uganda’s health minister, Jim Muhwezi, denies that there is any shortage of condoms in his country. “It is not true that there is a condom shortage,” he said. “There seems to be a coordinated smear campaign by those who do not want to use any other alternative simultaneously with condoms against AIDS.” In fact, Uganda officially uses the ABC approach: Abstinence before marriage; Be faithful in marriage; and use Condoms if you don’t do one or two.

But this isn't good enough for UN officials, whose love affair with condoms knows no bounds, and who are also angry with America for funding her own AIDS initiative in Africa instead of giving the money to them.

“Alas, from Stephen Lewis's point of view, the US is deplorably ‘unilateralist’ and spends its billions of AIDS dollars directly in Africa rather than sluicing them through the UN, where now that the Oil-for-Fraud program is no longer ‘needed,’ many bureaucrats are itching to bring their humanitarian expertise and efficiency to bear on another great slab of cash,” wrote Mark Steyn in the Canadian Western Standard, October 3. “Once the usual UN administration fee had been deducted from Bush's pitifully inadequate $15 billion, there could easily have been enough left over to buy, oh, twenty thousand bucks' worth of second-hand condoms from a rubber factory co-owned by a nephew of Kofi Annan and a cousin of Boutros Boutros-Ghali. Instead, the US decided to spend the cash itself.”

Why not? The UN’s approach has failed, and its own statistics show it. HIV rates keep rising, to over 30% in some countries. Two decades of pornographic sex education and massive shipments of condoms have sent millions of young Africans to an early grave.

But who on the Left cares about the facts? The UK Guardian sneers at Ugandan First Lady Janet Museveni’s abstinence campaign, ominously hinting that it is driven by her Christian beliefs. It scorns the poster campaigns that Mrs. Museveni has backed. “In one poster campaign, signed by the office of the first lady, the slogan alongside the picture of a smiling young woman says: ‘She's saving herself for marriage — how about you?’” said the paper.

It is this sort of thing that the UN and left-wing newspapers fear that Bush is going to promote in Africa.

Lewis is no new kid on the block shooting his mouth off. A former Canadian ambassador to the United Nations and former Deputy Executive Director of UNICEF, he is a long-time member of the establishment. His wife, Michele Landsberg, is a pro-abortion feminist activist and former columnist for the Toronto Star.

In August, the Global Fund for Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria pulled all funding from Uganda’s highly successful AIDS prevention program, alleging financial irregularities.

Apparently, achieving results isn’t good enough for international grandees. It’s death by condom or nothing. But we think the Bush administration will stay the course.


Stephen Lewis, the United Nations' special envoy to Africa for HIV/AIDS, has little good to say about the Bush administration's efforts there.

That the United States is spending more money than any other nation on stopping the spread of AIDS in Africa counts for little. He is upset with the US emphasis on abstinence, which he accuses of causing a condom shortage in Uganda.

Now Uganda happens to be the only sub-Saharan African country that has achieved a large reduction in its HIV prevalence rate. The adult HIV infection rate has dropped from 18% to 5-7%. No other nation in the world has achieved such success. Most sub-Saharan African nations, following the pro-condoms model, continue to suffer from rising HIV infection rates.

But then, other African nations do not have leaders like Ugandan President Museveni and his wife. This dynamic duo has consistently promoted an abstinence-first model that has successfully changed Ugandan culture. Ugandan surveys show a reduction in premarital sexual activity among Ugandan youth and a reduction in extramarital activity among adults.

The result: less AIDS.

This is, in Lewis's worldview, all wrong. He complains that the Bush administration’s shift of funding from condoms to abstinence promotion under its PEPFAR program has led to a shortage of the prophylactics in Uganda. “There is no doubt in my mind that the condom crisis in Uganda is being driven by PEPFAR,” said Lewis. “To impose a dogma-driven policy that is fundamentally flawed is doing damage to Africa."

This is a bizarre inversion of the truth, and threatens to do grievous harm to the one HIV/AIDS prevention approach that has actually worked.

Uganda’s health minister, Jim Muhwezi, denies that there is any shortage of condoms in his country. “It is not true that there is a condom shortage,” he said. “There seems to be a coordinated smear campaign by those who do not want to use any other alternative simultaneously with condoms against AIDS.” In fact, Uganda officially uses the ABC approach: Abstinence before marriage; Be faithful in marriage; and use Condoms if you don’t do one or two.

But this isn't good enough for UN officials, whose love affair with condoms knows no bounds, and who are also angry with America for funding her own AIDS initiative in Africa instead of giving the money to them.

“Alas, from Stephen Lewis's point of view, the US is deplorably ‘unilateralist’ and spends its billions of AIDS dollars directly in Africa rather than sluicing them through the UN, where now that the Oil-for-Fraud program is no longer ‘needed,’ many bureaucrats are itching to bring their humanitarian expertise and efficiency to bear on another great slab of cash,” wrote Mark Steyn in the Canadian Western Standard, October 3. “Once the usual UN administration fee had been deducted from Bush's pitifully inadequate $15 billion, there could easily have been enough left over to buy, oh, twenty thousand bucks' worth of second-hand condoms from a rubber factory co-owned by a nephew of Kofi Annan and a cousin of Boutros Boutros-Ghali. Instead, the US decided to spend the cash itself.”

Why not? The UN’s approach has failed, and its own statistics show it. HIV rates keep rising, to over 30% in some countries. Two decades of pornographic sex education and massive shipments of condoms have sent millions of young Africans to an early grave.

But who on the Left cares about the facts? The UK Guardian sneers at Ugandan First Lady Janet Museveni’s abstinence campaign, ominously hinting that it is driven by her Christian beliefs. It scorns the poster campaigns that Mrs. Museveni has backed. “In one poster campaign, signed by the office of the first lady, the slogan alongside the picture of a smiling young woman says: ‘She's saving herself for marriage — how about you?’” said the paper.

It is this sort of thing that the UN and left-wing newspapers fear that Bush is going to promote in Africa.

Lewis is no new kid on the block shooting his mouth off. A former Canadian ambassador to the United Nations and former Deputy Executive Director of UNICEF, he is a long-time member of the establishment. His wife, Michele Landsberg, is a pro-abortion feminist activist and former columnist for the Toronto Star.

In August, the Global Fund for Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria pulled all funding from Uganda’s highly successful AIDS prevention program, alleging financial irregularities.

Apparently, achieving results isn’t good enough for international grandees. It’s death by condom or nothing. But we think the Bush administration will stay the course.

Friday, October 14, 2005

Congressman Waxman disputes White House official's statement about sex-ed website

From The Hill e-news:

Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) is taking issue with a White House official's comments regarding congressional concerns about a federal sex-education website. Waxman has been highly critical of the 4parents.gov website, charging that it misrepresents facts about sexually transmitted diseases and condoms and negatively characterizes single mothers and homosexuals. In July, he wrote Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt to register his complaints. During a conference of the International Abstinence Education Leadership Conference in early August, Waxman says Claude Allen, one of President Bush's top domestic policy advisors, assured the group that the administration had defended the website's content to detractors. "We've gone back to them about it [and] made very clear that while they might have a disagreement with that information, it is based on fact, based on science, based on research," Waxman's letter quotes Allen as saying. Not so fast, Waxman writes: "Since sending the [July] letter, I have received no response." He asked Allen to explain the discrepancy by Oct. 28.


UNFPA Chairman Blasts President Bush on Withdrawing $ Over Abortion

Amsterdam, Netherlands (LifeNews.com) -- The chairman of the UNFPA on Wednesday attacked President Bush during his annual presentation of the status of the population agency. He blasted Bush for withholding $34 million in taxpayer funding of the UN operation because of its involvement in the forced abortion population control program in China. UNFPA chairman Joris Voorhoeve, a former minister of defense for the Netherlands, gave the group's annual report at The Hague. Voorhoeve said the money President Bush has withheld from the agency four times could have been used to prevent unwanted pregnancies by promoting contraception and birth control. He accused Bush of withholding the money out of "domestic political concerns," according to an Expatica News report. "This blockade by Bush is counterproductive. He is against abortion but withholding money from the UNFPA results in more illegal abortions in developing countries," Voorhoeve claimed. However, it is because of the UNFPA's involvement in the forced abortion program in China that Bush has stopped funding the agency for the last four years. The Bush administration sent two teams of investigators from the State Department and found that the UNFPA had been complicit in China's one-child program, which has resulted in numerous human rights abuses from forced abortions and sterilizations to wrongful imprisonment, job pressures and harassment. Read the complete story.

Monday, October 03, 2005

'Civility' called for at Red Mass

Saturday, October 01, 2005

Roberts confirmed. Who's next?